Latest tweets

Technology (curriculum)

TECHNOLOGY
Faculty Leader: Lisa Rhodes – lisa.rhodes@oatforge.co.uk
Subject Leader: Melissa Clarke – melissa.clarke@oatforge.co.uk
Subject Leader: Jenny Onafowokan – jenny.onafowokan@oatforge.co.uk
TLR holder 1 – Resistant Materials: Kelly Robinson – kelly.robinson@oatforge.co.uk
TLR holder 2 – Textiles: Laura Cheek – laura.cheek@oatforge.co.uk
TLR holder 3 – Food/Catering: Rebecca Potter – rebecca.potter@oatforge.co.uk

SMSC
Social
In technology, group work is encouraged where pupils discuss, plan and share out responsibilities enabling them to develop team working skills. Students are encouraged to look at a wide range of social factors in technology. This starts in KS3 and becomes more detailed in KS$/5. Throughout the design and make rotations in KS3 there is a strong focus on designing for a particular group of people. Students have to consider the needs of their target market to ensure their product is to be successful. In KS4 the coursework is always catered around a particular need or problem which students then have to research who would benefit from their outcome.

Moral
Pupils learn to develop a sense of purpose in technology by investigating issues in industry concerning fair trade and working conditions. Viewpoints of others and other potential ethical issues are discussed. Students will understand the implications of making decisions that affect different people, throughout the design process and consider the environment through their use of materials and processes. Students work in teams at various points to discuss and challenge moral beliefs, this is encouraged through debate in KS3 and 4.

Spiritual
Developing deep thinking and questioning the way in which the world works promotes the spiritual growth of students. In technology lessons pupils are always encouraged to delve deeper into their understanding of design and technology and how it relates to the world around them.

Cultural
Design and technology investigates into the diversity of differing cultures through exploration of cultural trends. Pupils learn traditions from a variety of different cultural backgrounds and are encouraged to apply them to a design situation. Cultural issues are further focused on throughout KS4 and 5 through looking at different religions/diets and products that would be suitable for specific cultural needs. Students are encouraged to accept different cultures and nationalities to deliver a balanced curriculum. There is strong focus in Food technology on different dietary needs of people, through their cultural beliefs and this is built into the schemes of work to look at “Foods from around the World”.

MORE ABLE STUDENTS
Talented design and technology pupils are nurtured and challenged at Ormiston Forge Academy. There is no ceiling on attainment and right from year 7 students are encouraged to push their creative boundaries. More able students are encouraged to work with more complex materials and design situations and take part in external fashion design competitions such as ‘young fashion designer of the year UK’. There is a T.O.T.T.A award where a student is chosen in each subject area in KS3 and recognised for their achievement. Postcards and regular praise My Stickers are given out weekly.

KEY STAGE 3: In key stage 3 technology works on a rotation basis where each student completes an 8 week project in each of the technology areas:

Year 7 Scheme of Work
Food Technology:
In food technology pupils in Year 7 will develop a range of practical skills linked to the theme of healthy eating and nutrition. During the rotation pupils build on existing knowledge about developing practical cooking skills making and preparing a range of dishes including fruit salad, pizza, pasta bake, fruit crumble and flapjacks. During the rotation pupils link these products to the balance plate and develop their understanding of nutrients needed in the body and why they are required. Learning extends to pupils being able to read and explain food labelling and cost their own products. Pupils are levelled throughout the rotation on designing products, making and evaluating and have the opportunity to revisit and develop their written work.

Textiles:
Pupils in year 7 are encouraged to develop key design and technology terminology and apply this in the classroom every lesson. The transition from year 6 to year 7 sees the development of sewing machine skills in which pupils design and manufacture a set of three juggling balls. During this rotation, pupils develop research and design skills and learn about the importance of considering ‘user’ views in design contexts. Pupils are able to learn and demonstrate at least 3 surface decoration techniques and apply them to their product. The final outcomes are monitored and checked for quality control by the pupils themselves in order to ensure the outcomes are of high quality.

Resistant Materials:
In Resistant materials students are developing a range of creative design skills, CAD/CAM (computer aided design and manufacture) and practical making skills. During the rotation students design and make a pewter cast key ring/jewellery pendant with presentation box. Throughout the project students work with a variety of materials, students learn a range of processes including the construction of a box, the pewter casting process and laser cutting. The main focus in this scheme is students learn how to research for designing a product and learn how to use planning to make a successful product. All work is levelled accordingly and students are given the chance to improve on their levels and apply further quality control checks to the making of their products to gain a higher mark.

Graphics:
In Graphics students are developing their creative designing skills through advertising and packaging. Pupils research what makes packaging effective and then they create a blister pack for a product of their choice. Through the use of hand skills and computer work pupils develop their packaging and complete a net using CAD/CAM (computer aided design and manufacture). Pupils will learn to use software such as 2D Design and Photoshop and then make the product using the laser cutter. The main focus in this scheme is designs and evaluation which will be levelled accordingly. Students will be given the chance to improve on their levels and apply further quality control checks to the making of their chosen packaging to gain a higher mark.

Year 8 Schemes of Work

Food Technology:
In year 8 pupils extend their practical skills further developing their own pizza dough, curry, spaghetti bolognaise, rice based dish and will have the opportunity to develop their own choice product. Pupils will gain confidence and experience using an extended range of equipment in food technology. Practical sessions are inter linked with theory lessons covering topics based on foods from around the world and special diets whilst pupils will also gain an understanding of fair-trade and ethical links associated with food technology. Pupils will be levelled on planning and specification and will use a range of research skills to develop products to a set brief.

Textiles:
In year 8, pupils in textiles technology develop on from the skills learnt in year 7. Additional surface decoration techniques are demonstrated and applied to a new design brief and context. The project is a communal outcome in which each pupil creates a ‘sweet’ inspired bunting panel; these panels will then be made into bunting to be displayed in school classrooms. This project covers a variety of cross curricular skills, including art. Pupils develop observational drawing and tonal shading techniques to support the research section of the project and inform them of ideas for their own panel. Pupils go onto develop evaluative and reasoning skills when justifying and deciding on their final product idea. This is a hands on, creative project that will allow pupils to make progress towards making skills in textiles.

Resistant Materials:
In year 8 students continue to build upon the skills and knowledge learnt in year 7 and apply these skills to create a rubber band racer. During this rotation we also introduce the concept of mechanical systems. Students design and make a moving vehicle that makes use of mechanisms. Students develop a range of designs for moving vehicles and they produce the detailed plans for manufacture. Students then go on to thoroughly evaluate and test their final product. During the evaluation the students have competitions and race the rubber band racers. Throughout the project, students work with a range of materials, woodworking processes, as well as developing problem solving and thinking skills. Students will be given the chance to improve on their levels and apply further quality control checks to the making of the rubber rand racer.

Graphics:
In year 8 students develop the computer and creative skills they learnt in year 7 and work on developing a board game. They must design the board, box and counters/cards to play the game. The main focus for this scheme is again ideas and specification. For the specification criteria pupils must make clear how the game will be played and how it must look. Through the use of hand skills and computer work pupils develop their board game and complete a net using CAD/CAM (computer aided design and manufacture). Pupils will learn to use software such as 2D Design and Photoshop and then make the product using the CNC (computer numerical control) plotter.

KEY STAGE 4
In Key Stage 4 all pupils study and sit a GCSE in their chosen technology area (AQA and WJEC).

Year 9 GCSE Catering:
Pupils work on 4 individual topics in Catering during year 9 building more comprehensively on the skills gained in Year 7 & 8 and preparing them for their practical GCSE exams.
Autumn Term
Pupils will complete a unit focusing on Street food investigating foods from around the world further and develop a range of appropriate snack products. Pupils will understand how to adapt products to make them healthier and will use a wide range of equipment including bread makers, fryers, pasta machines and food processors. Some of the dishes pupils will prepare could include burgers, flatbreads, samosas, skewers/kebabs. Pupils will continue to focus on healthy eating and looking at ways to reduce fat and sugar in all products.

Spring Term
During this term pupil will develop a wide range of baking skills through the preparations of pastry products, doughs, cakes and baked goods. Pupils will focus on adapting flavours with these products and decorative techniques to aid presentation including decorating small and large cakes, pies and party goods. The final task in this unit will be to prepare products for a cake sale for the groups chosen charities where pupils will calculate cost and selling prices for products.

Summer Term
The final term sees pupils making and preparing main course dishes such as stuffed chicken, fresh pasta, vegetable shaping and preparation and sauces. Pupils will understand clearly how to adapt a dish based on flavour and nutritional and how to cost a dish and calculate profit. Pupils will have the confidence to prepare a range of products & present an overall meal based on given design briefs having planned and costed their dishes – this it the opportunity to really show their creative skills.

Year 9 GCSE Textiles:
Autumn and Spring Terms
As a continuation of years 7 and 8, we expect our year 9’s to be able to confidently build on skills learnt previously and be able to apply these to a new context. This is another cross curricular project linked to ‘literacy’. Pupils are to design and manufacture a cushion reflecting 3 chosen artists. The research forms a large part of the course and is very experimental in that pupils are asked to design ideas using a variety of media. Following on from this, pupils will continue to develop experimental making skills by using a variety of materials and techniques to produce effective samples.

Summer Term
Following on from the spring term, pupils taking the textiles course will further develop the key skills required for their key stage 4 GCSE projects, focusing on construction making skills eg hems, seams and darts. During this time, pupils will begin to prepare for their textiles theory examination which scaffolds the making lessons. This is a very important year for development in both skill areas.

Year 9 GCSE Resistant Materials:
Autumn and Spring Terms
In year 9 we start the focus on materials, processes and construction techniques. Students build on previous skills and knowledge to produce a ‘man on the wall’. The man on the wall is a combination of focused practical tasks that incorporate all 3 resistant materials and their processes. Students develop a large range of making skills focusing entirely on tools, machines, materials, processes and safety in the workshop. Once students have built up their practical skills the focus moves onto a mini design and make project where students have the opportunity to apply their additional practical skills. This is a cross curricular project linked to literacy, Numeracy and ICT. Students are to design and manufacture a novelty clock. Design and development forms a large part of the project, students create a range of hand and CAD designs using software such as 2D Design and Google sketchup. Students then develop 3D and CAD modelling skills leading to a final solution. Following on from this students apply their skills and techniques to manufacture a novelty clock.

Summer Term
In the summer term the focus moves onto preparing pupils for the start of their Key stage 4 GCSE coursework, through developing their practical skills. In this term the aim of the project is to enable the students to work with a wide range of materials and experience many manufacturing processes. We also further develop drawing, modelling and CAD/CAM skills. Students will use this term to produce a small scale coursework project around the theme of a light up picture frame. They will use creativity and electronics to bring the product alive.

Year 9 GCSE Graphics:
Autumn and Spring Terms
In year 9 the focus becomes more dedicated towards computer graphics and pupils develop the skill to model in 3D. They use software such as Google sketchup and Macromedia Fireworks to design and make a new style USB stick. The outcome is a quality product made from acrylic plastic that functions as a memory stick. Students work on developing and modifying their designs through the use of 3D modelling and additional drawing skills are developed such as two point perspective and other technical drawing techniques.
Summer Term
In the summer term the focus moves onto preparing pupils for the start of their coursework through developing their practical skills. The focus moves onto physical modelling using Styrofoam and modelling tools to look at developing a prototype. Industrial processes such as die cutting, vacuum forming and different printing techniques are also investigated.

Year 9 GCSE Child Development

Autumn Term
Three modules of work will be started, one lesson for each, in order to introduce the syllabus and the coursework requirements.
The first one is entitled Parenthood. This will cover the syllabus requirements for preparing for a baby, including types of families, the roles of men and women and how they have changed over the years, and the effects that having a baby might have on one’s lifestyle.
The second module is entitled Pregnancy and pupils will study the female reproductive system and
understand conception and contraception.
The third module will be called Children and Play. This will be largely electronic and will prepare the pupils for coursework, as the two pieces of controlled assessment feature different aspects of play.

Spring Term
The three modules will continue. Module One will consider pre-conceptual care. Module Two will include antenatal care, checks and tests and the roles of different people who will be encountered in pregnancy. Module Three will start to introduce elements that can be included in the first piece of coursework which a research task and is likely to be on outdoor play.

Summer Term
Module One will now be finished a module entitled “The Home” will be introduced which will cover hygiene, safety and the prevention of accidents.
Module Two will continue and will introduce childbirth, including birth plans, pain relief and post-natal care.
Module Three will continue with pupils working on the research task.

Year 10 GCSE Catering:
Autumn Term
Pupils start the year with a focus on Food hygiene and safety and have the opportunity to achieve their Level 2 Food Hygiene certificate. Pupils will continually investigate different commodities and functions of ingredients looking at a range of areas such as cooking methods, nutrition whilst building a knowledge of the catering industry as a whole. All commodity areas will include a wide and varied range of practicals which continually build and develop skills, pupils will have opportunities to select their own recipes as well as following set recipe ideas.

Spring Term
Pupils will investigate costings and portion control and refocus on baked good towards the end of the term in preparation for their coursework exam. During this term pupils will complete their first coursework project which counts for 20% of the final grade. This project allows pupils to select and make 4 products suitable for an Afternoon tea which are produced during a 3 hour practical exam. Pupils research the historical origins of afternoon tea and select appropriate products, all dishes are tested and planned in preparation for the exam. Pupils collect customer feedback on all products and use this to evaluate.

Summer Term
Pupils will continue to complete and finalise their coursework project. Once completed pupils will investigate the laws and legislations which caterers must adhere to and cover basic first aid. The practical element will continue with pupils beginning to look at cultural dishes in preparation for coursework 2 in Year 11.

Year 10 GCSE Textiles:
Autumn Term
During the autumn term, year 10 pupils are able to choose a design context set by the exam board to follow through with until the end of year 11. There is a variety of choice for the design contexts, including designing and making fashion products, homeware, children’s wear, toys, to name a few.
After selecting their chosen project, pupils will continue to research into their topics to give them a great understanding of the project context. Pupils are expected to utilise the research found to inform their future design ideas. During this research process, pupils will continue to upskill in theoretical knowledge for their examination in at least one lesson a week. Topics in this term focus on basic functions of fibres, yarns, fabric construction and fibre properties.

Spring Term
Following on from research and analysis, pupils will begin to develop design ideas linking to their research and specification. During this time, we encourage pupils to be experimental in the presentation of their designs, in particular, we develop skills in CAD design and developments. This section of the project involves producing initial ideas, developing 4 ideas and then developing a chosen design further. An informed choice can be made regarding the proposal of a final design. Pupils continue to develop reflective skills as they work towards selecting an appropriate choice of final design.

Summer Term
After developmental stages of the project, including surface decoration experimentation and design ideas, we encourage pupils to develop skills in pattern drafting. The outcome of this is for pupils to have make a prototype of their final product. Although the purchase of commercial patterns is acceptable for this exam board, we would like to challenge our students in gaining key skills of fashion design through the creation of a pattern. This allows pupils to take ownership and responsibility of their outcome. During the idea generation section, pupils will continue to upskill in theoretical knowledge for their examination in at least one lesson a week. Topics in this term focus on smart and modern technologies, pattern terminology/symbols as well as health and safety in the workshop. A mock examination paper will be completed to assess pupils emerging needs and progress.

Year 10 GCSE Resistant Materials:
Autumn Term
During the autumn term the GCSE in resistant materials course begins, the course is intended to develop students’ designing and making skills in interesting and exciting ways. Year 10 pupils are able to choose a design context set by the exam board to follow through with until the end of year 11. The most popular design context is to design and make a storage unit for gadgets and gizmos. After selecting their chosen project, pupils will continue to research into their topics to give them a great understanding of the project context. Pupils are expected to utilise the research found to inform their future design ideas. During this term, one lesson a week will be used to update skills needed for the exam. Topics in this term focus on materials, manufacturing processes, constructions skills, and finishing skills.

Spring Term
In the spring term, pupils will begin to develop their design ideas linking to their research and specification, this section requires them to become creative and innovative. During this time, we encourage pupils to be experimental in the presentation of their designs, in particular, we develop skills in CAD (computer aided design) design and developments. This section of the project involves producing initial ideas, developing 2 ideas further, using 3D and CAD modelling and then developing a chosen design. An informed choice can be made regarding the proposal of a final design. Pupils continue to develop reflective skills as they work towards selecting an appropriate choice of final design.

Summer
After the design and development stages of the project students make a prototype of their final product. Once students are happy with the final solution they then move on to planning for manufacture of their design with the potential for commercial production. This allows pupils to take ownership and responsibility of their final outcome. Pupils are given the flexibility to work with a range of woods, metals and plastics. During the idea generation section, students revisit the skills gained throughout the full GCSE course and prepare for the 2 hour examination, which is taken at the end of year 11. A mock examination paper will be completed to assess pupils emerging needs and progress.

Year 10 GCSE Graphics:

Autumn Term
Year 10 pupils are able to choose a design context set by the exam board to follow through with until the end of year 11. The most popular one is to design and make an advertising standee and ticket for a film designed by choice. After selecting their chosen project, pupils will continue to research into their topics to give them a great understanding of the project context. Pupils are expected to utilise the research found to inform their future design ideas. During this term, one lesson a week will be used to update skills needed for the exam. Homework tasks will be set weekly to reflect the coursework tasks undergoing in lessons.

Spring Term
Following on from the research section covered during the Autumn Term, students will begin to design their products. These designs are to reflect the research they have undertaken and to show development. Skills up to this point have been broad in nature and cover many aspects of design and technology. However, this term is used to develop technical drawing styles as they make up a large part of both the coursework and exam.

Summer Term
The final term of year 10 is used to model the designs that students have created to give a realistic view of how they will look when manufactured. A key part to design and technology is that students have the ability to problems solve and suggest improvements to their designs based on reflective thinking. Through this term, designs will be developed further and then the manufacture of their products will be planned.

Year 10 GCSE Child Development:
Autumn Term
Syllabus work will continue, concentrating on the new born baby and caring for the baby’s needs at home. Illnesses and preparing children for hospital will also be studied.
In terms of controlled assessment, the research task will continue. A leaflet to summarise findings will be produced using ICT and the whole assignment will be evaluated and completed.

Spring Term
The second piece of coursework will be introduced, which is the child study. Pupils will describe a child they know, who is no older than 3 years of age and whom they are able to visit regularly. It is a requirement of the course pupils have access to such a child. Pupils will write up an introductory visit to gather information on this child. Syllabus work will concentrate on the development of a child – physically, intellectually, emotionally and socially (PIES)

Summer Term
Pupils will be given a task title as a focus for their child study, usually connected to a type of play and will start to research this through looking at websites, books, conducting questionnaires, inventories of the child’s toys. This will planned beforehand and concluded afterwards.

Year 11 GCSE Catering:
Autumn Term
The focus will in Year 11 moves towards cultural foods and special diets, students will continue to consider nutrition and menu analysis in their choice a selection of dishes. Coursework 2 focuses on planning and preparing a 2 course meal for 2 people from a country of student choice. Research features around investigating possible countries an analysis of dishes to ensure pupils are producing highly skilled dishes throughout. Once again pupils will begin to test and develop dishes which are suitable and show their skills and ability to the highest.

Spring Term
Once dishes have been selected and tested pupils must plan and prepare for a 3 hour practical exam where all dishes must be executed to the highest standard considering presentation of all dishes. Students must critically evaluate their dishes and skills gaining feedback from tasters.

Summer Term
This term focuses on revision for all topics covered in catering – student knowledge will be tested using a mixture of examination questions, quizzes, games and some practical elements.

Year 11 GCSE Textiles:
Autumn Term
Now that students have finalised a design to manufacture and have created a prototype of their final outcome, students can now begin to apply their knowledge and understanding to their final major product. Students are requested to purchase their chosen fabrics during the summer holidays in order to start this section of the course promptly. In this section, pupils apply their making skills independently. In particular, the accuracy of their measurements and machine sewing. During the idea making section, pupils will continue to upskill in theoretical knowledge for their examination in at least one lesson a week. Topics in this term focus on environmental, moral, cultural and social issues as well as fabric finishes and exam style questions on making processes.

Spring Term
Students will continue to manufacture their final outcome implementing quality control checks at every stage. Following on from the manufacture of their product, students should evaluate their processes and procedures in thorough detail, referencing any changes that they could make. Shortly after this, students should have completed the coursework section equating to 60% of the qualification. During the idea making section, pupils will continue to upskill in theoretical knowledge for their examination in at least one lesson a week. Topics in this term focus on manufacturing in industry, British and European standards.

Summer Term
The short summer will focus on theoretical knowledge covered throughout key stage 4. Games and quizzes are encouraged to build on pupils’ prior learning. This term also focuses on examination command words and understanding examination formats.

Year 11 GCSE Resistant Materials:
Autumn Term
In this section, students now have a finalised design to manufacture. Students can now apply their knowledge and making skills accurately and independently. In particular, the accuracy of their measurements, construction techniques and carrying out quality control checks are areas of focus. During the making section, students build up an evidence of manufacture, students work will be photographed throughout the process to show how they made their products. Also during this section, students will continue to build in theoretical knowledge for their exam in at least one lesson a week. Topics in this term focus on sustainability, social, moral, cultural, and environmental issues as well as manufacturing process and material production. To conclude the coursework, students will test and evaluate their products to determine their success. Modifications and improvements are suggested to demonstrate further their subject knowledge. To complete this term students will have completed the coursework section equating to 60% of the qualification. Students will submit their completed portfolio of work, their final product and their grades will be sent to the exam board.

Spring Term
Now that all the coursework is complete, in the spring term students will start to prepare for their exam by completing a series of mini projects where student skills will be developed further. Topics in this term focus on all previous covered as well as, smart materials, ICT in technology and new technologies. These will be assessed using exam style questions to enable them to perform well in their exams. These exams make up the remaining 40% of the qualification.

Summer
The summer term before the exam will involve the students undertaking research into the given design theme from the exam board together with reinforcing knowledge and refining techniques covered throughout key stage 4. Games and quizzes are encouraged to build on pupils’ prior learning. This term also focuses on examination keyword technique and understanding examination style questions using past practise papers.

Year 11 GCSE Graphics:
Autumn Term
By this stage pupils will have finalised a design to manufacture and have created a rough model of their final outcome, pupils can now begin to apply their knowledge to manufacturing their product. In this section, pupils apply their making skills independently. In particular, the accuracy of their measurements and CAD work to work out the construction of their design. Photoshop will be used to produce the graphics for their standee and ticket. During the making section, pupils will continue to upskill in theoretical knowledge for their examination in at least one lesson a week. Topics in this term focus on environmental, moral, cultural and social issues as well as manufacturing process and material production. Evidence of manufacture will be photographed throughout the process to show how they made their products. To conclude the project, students will test and evaluate their products to determine their success. Modifications and improvements are suggested to demonstrate further their subject knowledge.

Spring Term
At this point in Year 11, pupils should have completed the coursework section equating to 60% of the qualification. Following on from this, students will start to prepare for their exam by completing a series of mini projects where student skills will be developed. These will be monitored and assessed using exam style questions to enable them to perform well in their exams. These exams make up the remaining 40% of the qualification.

Summer Term
The summer term before the exam will focus on knowledge for the exam covered throughout key stage 4. Games and quizzes are encouraged to build on pupils’ prior learning. This term also focuses on examination command words and understanding examination formats using practise papers.

Year 11 GCSE Child Development:
Autumn Term
Pupils have already completed the Research Task, worth 20%, in Year 10 and have started the second piece of coursework, the Child Study, worth 40%. They should have completed the research section of this project. In Autumn Term, pupils will use this research to plan 4 activities to carry out with the child they are studying. These visits have to be planned, further researched, carried out and evaluated. The 4 visits will help the pupils to determine what progress the child is making in the 4 areas of development: physical, intellectual, emotional and social. The coursework is completed electronically and so can easily be accessed at home, or anywhere with internet. A trial exam will also be taken in December. It would be an advantage if pupils could buy a revision guide available from staff, currently at £3.50.

Spring Term
The Child Study will be evaluated and thus completed. There will be some time to upgrade if needed, to make expected progress. The rest of the syllabus will be studied, concentrating on the two sections: diet, care and health of the child, and support for families. Plenty of exam questions will be answered and homework set in preparation for the exam.

Summer Term
After Easter, we go right back to the start of the syllabus and revise everything again as far as is possible. This will include the three sections: parenthood, pregnancy and development of the child delivered in year 10. This will often be done in a fun away with quizzes and puzzles to help retention of information. Pupils will have their exercise book from year 10 which will be invaluable.

Site content © Ormiston Forge Academy 2012-2014.
Ormiston Forge Academy, Wrights Lane, Cradley Heath, West Midlands, B64 6QU. Tel: 01384 566 598.