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Religious Education (curriculum)

RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Subject Leader: Sarah Shuttleworth – sarah.shuttleworth@oatforge.co.uk
Lead Practitioner: Zoe Coules – zoe.coules@oatforge.co.uk

SMSC
Social
Students are encouraged to think about their interaction with others, demonstrating respect and appreciation of a variety of cultures and beliefs. Students often take part in group work, enabling them to work well with others.

Moral
Students develop their moral purpose throughout RS by discussing moral issues such as abortion, euthanasia, animal rights and capital punishment.

Spiritual
Students are supported in developing their thinking and reasoning skills in RS. They debate issues such as the existence of God vs evil and suffering in the world, and learn a range of perspectives regarding spirituality.

Cultural
Students learn the importance of culture both within religion and outside of it. They study ideas around prejudice and discrimination, and the ways that religious beliefs and practices can co-exist in British culture.

MORE ABLE STUDENTS
More Able students in RS are challenged to think more deeply and evaluate convincingly. Students in KS3 are encouraged to find and use a range of evidence to support religious beliefs, and to debate a range of viewpoints on moral issues coming to a well-reasoned conclusion. In KS4, students have the opportunity to study a more challenging unit which prepares them for the A Level course in Philosophy and Ethics.

KEY STAGE 3
Year 7 Scheme of Work
Autumn Term
An introduction to Christianity, to include its origins, beliefs about God and Jesus, and how beliefs may affect a Christian’s life.
Spring Term
The Journey of Life, to include ideas on when life begins, when someone is old enough to choose their religion, the importance and different types of marriage, and beliefs about treatment of the elderly.
Summer Term
Religion and Science, to include the debate on whether religion and science can co-exist, and varying beliefs on creation.
Stewardship, to include the concept of stewardship, how this applies to life today, and what this means for religious believers.

Year 8 Scheme of Work
Autumn Term
Injustice, to include key figures who have fought injustice, for example Martin Luther King, Rosa Parks and Thich Quang Doc.
The Holocaust, to include the effect that the Holocaust had on Jewish practices and belief in God.
Spring Term
The study of one key religion.
Summer Term
The Sanctity of Life, to include the debates surrounding abortion, euthanasia and animal rights.
The Existence of God, to include philosophical discussions regarding the plausibility of belief in God.

KEY STAGE 4
In Key Stage 4 all pupils study and sit a Full Course GCSE in Religious Studies (AQA). Students following the current specification, for last examination in 2017, sit two units. More Able students have the opportunity to study an alternative unit which further prepares them for A Level qualifications.

GCSE Religious Studies
Year 9
Autumn Term
Christianity – key beliefs and teachings, to include the nature of God, the problem of evil and suffering, the Trinity, the person of Jesus Christ.
Spring Term
Christianity – religious practices, to include worship, sacraments, the place of prayer, and the role of the church in the local community.
Summer Term
The introduction of a theme, for example relationships and families, the existence of God or religion, peace and conflict.

Year 10
Autumn Term
Unit 3 – Religious Attitudes to Crime and Punishment, to include secular and religious views regarding causes of crime, the purpose of punishment, methods of punishment and their effectiveness, and the debate surrounding capital punishment.
Spring Term
Unit 3 – Religious attitudes to the Elderly and Death, to include secular and religious views regarding the treatment of the elderly, the use of hospices, hospitals and homes for the elderly, the debate surrounding euthanasia and the importance of self-determination, and ideas about life after death.
Summer Term
Students will study one of the following two units:
Unit 2 – Religion and Animal Rights, to include secular and religious views regarding the value of animals, ways that humans use or abuse animals, and the different types of diet, for example vegetarianism and veganism

Unit 4 – The Existence of God, to include the study of four key arguments for the existence of God, and why people may not believe in God.

Year 11
Autumn Term
Students will study one of the following two units:
Unit 3 – Religious Attitudes to Crime and Punishment, to include secular and religious views regarding causes of crime, the purpose of punishment, methods of punishment and their effectiveness, and the debate surrounding capital punishment.

Unit 4 – Immortality, to include the concept of dualism, the likelihood of immortality and the options of immortality, for example heaven and hell, or reincarnation

Spring Term
Students will study one of the following two units:
Unit 3 – Religious attitudes to the Elderly and Death, to include secular and religious views regarding the treatment of the elderly, the use of hospices, hospitals and homes for the elderly, the debate surrounding euthanasia and the importance of self-determination, and ideas about life after death.

Unit 4 – Miracles, to include the plausibility of miracles, examples of miracles in history, tradition and from experience, and what miracles reveal about God.

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